HomeListening Sub-skills Practice for Cambridge English: Advanced & Proficiency (3)

TASK 1

A wide range of verbs may be used in multiple-choice questions to report what is said in the discussion that you listen to. Choose the correct reporting verbs to match the definitions below.

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TASK 2

In the Listening paper, it is important to quickly identify both the context of a discussion and the views of the speakers. Listen to extracts 1–6 from a talk by an anthropologist. Choose the correct description of what the speaker is doing.

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[spoiler title=’Transcripts’ style=’orange’ collapse_link=’true’]

  1. I have always treated data from the early researchers in my field with some caution. They were pioneers, and so although you have to admire what they did, the data may be slightly unreliable.
  2. There is a lot of talk about globalization these days, and the impact it has on cultures around the world. I find this concern understandable but also slightly exaggerated. I wouldn’t worry much about your culture disappearing.
  3. Doing research into other cultures is always fascinating. However, it is not particularly easy. Usually a social scientist sits in the corner and observes. I’ve done it a lot, but you sometimes realize you are not being as objective as you should be in these situations.
  4. Forecasts are difficult, but social scientists always get asked to make them. So if you pressed me on this, I’d say that there is only a slim chance of traditional music disappearing forever and being replaced by a more globalized musical culture.
  5. It’s a fascinating field to work in, and there’s a lot of public interest in some aspects of what we do. I’d like to write something for the general reader, and should have tried that earlier in my career. What I’ve done so far has been very technical, and I am sorry to say that most of my friends and even one or two of my colleagues couldn’t make much sense of it.
  6. I spend a good deal of my time at the university, where there’s plenty of administration and paperwork to do. And that’s not really what I came into anthropology to do. For most of us social scientists, it is the field work and research which is what motivates us, and I don’t know why I am not allowed to get out there and do more.

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TASK 3

In the Listening paper, it is important to quickly identify the main point that speakers are making. Listen to extracts 1–5 from an interview with an archaeologist. What is the main point made in each extract? Choose the best option.

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[spoiler title=’Transcripts & Explanations’ style=’orange’ collapse_link=’true’]

  1. As an undergraduate, I studied Ancient Greek because I wanted to read the Greek philosophers in their original language. However, I didn’t enjoy it as much as I expected. It was only when I saw a TV documentary about a professor who was responsible for excavating one of the main historical sites in Greece that I got hooked on archaeology. I was just inspired by the charisma of the guy featured in the programme, and the incredible dedication of the team with him, most of whom were quite young – in fact, they were all around my age. I chose archaeology without really knowing what it involved. But fortunately things have turned out very well and I have no regrets about the path I took.
    The speaker mentions wanting to read the Greek philosophers and the incredible dedication of a team of archaeologists. However, the speaker mainly talks about the reasons for his career choice. He says It was only when I saw a TV documentary about a professor … excavating one of the main historical sites in Greece that I got hooked on archaeology. I was just inspired by the charisma of the guy.
  2. The archaeological site I’ve become associated with certainly wasn’t very well understood when I first took charge. But we’ve gradually increased our understanding over the last twenty years. It also wasn’t visited much by anyone at the beginning, perhaps because it was in a very poor condition. Now it’s in all the tourist guides, so I like to think that in some small way people are just that bit more informed about archaeology and local history because of the research my team have done. That’s something that gives me some satisfaction.
    The speaker mentions working for a period of twenty years on an archaeological site that wasin a very poor condition. However, the speaker mainly talks about the importance to him of the public’s interest. He says I like to think … people are just that bit more informed about archaeology and local history because of the research my team have done. That’s something that gives me some satisfaction.
  3. People often ask if my job is tiring. Well, although I’m travelling a lot between Europe and the States, it’s not something I really think about, and so you won’t hear me complaining. You see, I feel I’m incredibly fortunate to be doing what I do. But the frustration we all have to live with in this profession is that the funding isn’t always there to support your big plans. This means sometimes you just have to say: ‘Well, we can’t be too ambitious because we’re working on a budget.’ I spend a lot of time trying to raise cash to do more. Thankfully, a lot of the people who work for me are volunteers who are just passionate about archaeology. We all know that a big discovery or breakthrough could happen at any time!
    The speaker does not mention the physical demands of the job in this extract. He does mention working with people who are just passionate about archaeology, but he mainly talks about financial limitations. The speaker says the funding isn’t always there to support your big plans. This means sometimes you just have to say: ‘Well, we can’t be too ambitious because we’re working on a budget.’ I spend a lot of time trying to raise cash.
  4. Yes, it’s true that I’ve written a lot of academic books. I think most people in this field will have done the same. It’s part of the job. But one year we had a ten-year-old here with her father working on the archaeological dig, and she was so keen and excited about everything that I started to think about how what archaeologists do could be communicated to the younger age group. Colleagues were surprised I had this idea and thought I wouldn’t have the time to write something like this book. But it’s been fun, and a welcome break from all the academic stuff I do.
    The speaker has written a lot of academic books but does not mention a lack of support from colleagues or difficulty in getting his books published. The speaker’s main point is to express a desire to widen the appeal of archaeology. He says I started to think about how what archaeologists do could be communicated to the younger age group.
  5. Working in the desert is certainly hard. It’s one of the harshest environments you can imagine, and you have to be ready for it. But quite often you can walk for a fairly short distance and then come across something just lying on the surface, like part of a stone tool or a piece of pottery. This tells you that something significant may be buried underneath. In urban areas you are much more limited and may have to rely on guesswork to find a suitable place to work. And most sites of value have modern buildings on top of them!
    The speaker says that you have to be ready to work in the desert, and he also mentions objects that you can find there such as part of a stone tool or a piece of pottery. However, the speaker’s main point is to explain how easily sites can be found in the desert as opposed to urban areas. He says often you can walk for a fairly short distance and then come across something just lying on the surface … In urban areas you are much more limited and may have to rely on guesswork … And most sites of value have modern buildings on top of them!

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TASK 4

It’s important to listen out for words in the discussion that have similar meanings to key words in the multiple-choice questions. Choose the words to match the underlined parts in the sentences below.

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TASK 5

It’s important to listen out for words in the discussion that have similar meanings to key words in the multiple choice questions. For the pairs of sentences below, complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence. Write one word only.

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References
Acknowledgements

All authors must admit to a dependence on the work of others. We are no exception. We owe a huge debt of gratitude to all the publications and reference sources that we have consulted and adapted for educational purposes. It would also have been quite impossible to have produced the material on this website without adapting a variety of authentic resources that we have regularly referred to. While every effort has been made, it has not always been possible to identify and cite the sources of all the material used or to trace all copyright holders. We will be happy to omit any contents or include any appropriate acknowledgements when they are brought to our notice.

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