Word Buildingcompanion, company; accompany

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Origins

from The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

A companion is literally ‘a person who you eat bread with’. The word comes from Old French compaignon, from Latin com- ‘together with’ and panis ‘bread’. Other English words that derive from panis include pannier (Middle English), pastille (mid 17th century) a ‘little loaf’ of something, and pantry (Middle English). Company (Middle English) and accompany (Late Middle English) come from the same root.

Derivatives

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References
Acknowledgements

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