HomeTeaching Notes · Cambridge English: Advanced Listening Part 4

Now let’s look at Part 4. In Part 4, there are five short extracts in which five different speakers talk about a topic. As in the other parts of the paper, the recording is played twice. However, candidates have two different matching tasks to complete. These two tasks focus on different things in the texts — for example, the speakers’ feelings about something and the advice they would give to others on the subject.

In the sample Part 4 that we are going to look at, the speakers are talking about changing their jobs.

There are two tasks in Part 4. The first task focuses on the reason each speaker gives for changing jobs. The second task focuses on what each speaker thinks about their new job.

The main skills being assessed are listening for gist and listening for main ideas. (It is important to remind your learners that they are not listening for detail, and it may not be useful to go through the audio script with learners after they have listened.)

The extracts are also likely to feature informal language and a variety of accents.

It is particularly important in Part 4, where learners are listening for main ideas, to encourage them to think about the topic beforehand and to make predictions about what they are going to hear. Before we look at the question, make notes on the following:  

  • What reasons are there for changing jobs?
  • How do people feel when they start a new job?

Then check your predictions with the ideas expressed in the options in this Part 4 question.

In the Listening paper, candidates have 45 seconds to look at the options for both Part 4 tasks. They should use this time to read through all eight options and think about what they mean. Reading the introduction and task instructions carefully will help them to do this. Notice that there are eight possibilities to choose from for each task, so not all of the ideas will be mentioned by the speakers.

Remember that the speaker is unlikely to use the same words as in the options, so it is important for candidates to think about the meaning of each option and how it might be worded differently in the listening extract.

Also remember that as candidates are listening for main ideas, the ideas may not be expressed explicitly or be located in one particular place. So, for example, a speaker could be saying he/she was not made to feel welcome at work — and this could match with the option unfriendly colleagues as a reason for leaving a job.

Let’s listen to some of the extracts. The first time you listen, just try to get a general idea of what each speaker is talking about. As was mentioned earlier, the speakers may have different accents.

Match the speakers to the pictures.

[one_sixth]

Speaker ❶
Speaker ❷
Speaker ❸

[/one_sixth]

[five_sixth_last]

Ⓐ  Ⓑ 
Ⓒ 

[/five_sixth_last]

[spoiler title=’KEY & TRANSCRIPT’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

❶Ⓒ After college I worked in a bank to make money. It’s a great job if you like sitting at the same desk every day, surrounded by the same familiar faces. I got plenty of annual leave and the work itself was quite demanding, but one day I woke up and realised that it didn’t amount to much, and was really pretty pointless. Handing in my notice was the next logical step. I set up as a freelance photographer – a job I’d always dreamed of. After the first six months or so of sheer panic, I feel much calmer; this will always be a risky job, but ultimately a far more rewarding one – not financially, mind you!

❷Ⓐ The family car sales business was the obvious and safe career route for me, even though we didn’t always see eye to eye. I’d no complaints about the money, but that didn’t stop me looking at what other people were doing and thinking ‘Now that’s something I’d really like to get my teeth into’. And that’s how I got into rally driving really. I went to rally school part-time, then got signed up by a rally team. That’s when I left the motor business, not without a bit of soul-searching! I miss the family, but looking at myself now – travelling the world, maybe even having the chance to make millions, living on the edge – what’s not to love?

❸Ⓑ I’ve always worked in the music industry – but was never made to feel very welcome in the marketing department. I guess my face didn’t fit although I was doing well enough. Then by chance I heard a band playing in my local venue and thought they were great – I got them signed up and suddenly realised this was exactly the type of work that suited me and my abilities – searching for talent, giving kids a start in the business I loved. So, after a while I left the company to do just that – on a freelance basis. Pay’s not bad – it’s possible to negotiate good percentages – but that’s not why I do it.

[/spoiler]

Answering the questions    

Now let’s look at part of the Listening paper Part 4 tasks that were based on these extracts about changing jobs.

First you’re going to identify the reason each speaker gives for changing his or her job and then you’re going to think about how each speaker feels about his or her new job.

Choose from the list (ⒶⒸ) the reason each speaker gives for changing his or her job. Match the comments to the speakers.



[spoiler title=’KEY’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

❶Ⓑ ❷Ⓒ ❸Ⓐ

[/spoiler]

Choose from the list (ⒶⒸ) the reason each speaker gives for changing his or her job. Match the comments to the speakers.



[spoiler title=’KEY’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

❶Ⓑ ❷Ⓐ ❸Ⓒ

[/spoiler]

How did you approach this task? Did you take one task at a time or did you approach the two tasks simultaneously and then use the second time you listened to check your answers?

Your learners may prefer to do one task at a time, or to focus on them both at once, answering the questions they find easiest the first time. They can then use the second time they hear the recording to deal with the more difficult questions and to check their answers. When preparing learners for Part 4 in class, provide opportunities for your learners to practise both approaches to find out which method suits them best.

Always encourage your learners to explain why they have chosen their answers. If they have chosen the wrong answer, you will need to help them to understand how to select the correct one.

Choose the correct words to complete the explanations.

Speaker ❶ The answer is lacking a sense of purpose because the speaker talks about.
Speaker ❷ The answer is needing more of a challenge because the speaker talks about .
Speaker ❸ The answer is needing more of a challenge because the speaker talks about .

Speaker ❶ The answer is relieved the initial uncertainty is over because the speaker talks about .
Speaker ❷ The answer is delighted by a change in lifestyle because the speaker talks about .
Speaker ❸ The answer is glad to be helping other people because the speaker talks about.

[spoiler title=’KEY’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

Speaker ❶ The answer is lacking a sense of purpose because the speaker talks about.
Speaker ❷ The answer is needing more of a challenge because the speaker talks about .
Speaker ❸ The answer is needing more of a challenge because the speaker talks about .

Speaker ❶ The answer is relieved the initial uncertainty is over because the speaker talks about.
Speaker ❷ The answer is delighted by a change in lifestyle because the speaker talks about .
Speaker ❸ The answer is glad to be helping other people because the speaker talks about .

[/spoiler]

Understanding informal language

As you have probably noticed, some of the language used in these extracts is informal. Your learners will need to be prepared for this because this type of language is often used in Part 4. You can help them by encouraging them to listen out for and keep a record of informal expressions, along with their more formal equivalents. This will also be useful preparation for Writing tasks.

Here are some of the informal expressions used in the extracts you listened to.

Look at the sentences and phrases given. Then put the words given in the correct order to form informal alternatives.

  1. We sometimes disagreed with each other.
  2. the opportunity to earn a lot of money
  3. There is no reason not to like that.

[spoiler title=’KEY’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

  1. We didn’t always see eye to eye.
  2. the chance to make millions
  3. What’s not to love?

[/spoiler]

LESSON PLAN

[google-drive-embed url=”https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RpET_0KbAfMvITKhqbrWlRL_EwC2-fK6/preview?usp=drivesdk” title=”lesson plan advanced listening part 4.pdf” icon=”https://drive-thirdparty.googleusercontent.com/16/type/application/pdf” width=”100%” height=”400″ style=”embed”]

References
Acknowledgements

All authors must admit to a dependence on the work of others. We are no exception. We owe a huge debt of gratitude to all the publications and reference sources that we have consulted and adapted for educational purposes. It would also have been quite impossible to have produced the material on this website without adapting a variety of authentic resources that we have regularly referred to. While every effort has been made, it has not always been possible to identify and cite the sources of all the material used or to trace all copyright holders. We will be happy to omit any contents or include any appropriate acknowledgements when they are brought to our notice.

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